Tinsley OdenProfessor J. Tinsley Oden was inducted into the Hall of Fame for Oklahoma State's College of Engineering, Architecture, and Technology.

The honor recognized his distinguished contributions to the literature in computational and theoretical mechanics, continuum mechanics, and structural mechanics. Oden had received the College's first Melvin R. Lohmann Medal in 1991 for his earlier contributions.

His treatise, Finite Elements of Nonlinear Continua, published in 1972 is cited as having not only demonstrated the great potential of computational methods for producing quantitative realizations of the most complex theories of physical behavior of materials and mechanical systems, but also established computational mechanics as a new intellectually rich discipline that was built upon deep concepts in mathematics, computer sciences, physics, and mechanics. Computational Mechanics has since become a fundamentally important discipline throughout the world, taught in every major university, and the subject of continued research and intellectual activity. Oden has published extensively in this field and in related areas over the last three decades.

Oden has authored over 600 scientific publications: books, book chapters, conference papers, and monographs. He is among the most highly cited researchers in the world in refereed, peer-reviewed journals, according to the International Scientific Index. serves as a member of the Predictive Engineering Science Panel for Sandia National Laboratories and as a member of the IUTAM Working Party 5 on Computational Mechanics. He is an editor of Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering and serves on the editorial board of 27 scientific journals.

He is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering, and a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He was knighted as "Chevalier des Palmes Academiques" by the French government and holds five honorary doctorates.

His current research focuses on the subject of multiscale modeling and on new theories and methods his group has developed for what they refer to as "adaptive modeling."

Tinsley serves as director of the Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences (ICES).